archive


FUTURERITUAL was established in 2017 by artist Joseph Morgan Schofield in collaboration with Thomas Yeomans. The initial phase (2017/18) of the project took the form of six itinerant performance events, which temporarily activated and inhabited a series of borrowed spaces in London, Folkestone, Bristol and Leeds.

In 2019, FR, presented a three day programme of performances, screenings and discussion in East London, curated by Joseph. The programme was hosted by Kunstraum and the Live Art Development Agency.


Emerging from multiple UK lockdowns, FR presented a residential workshop, gathering artists in a space of gathering and communion. In 2022, FR has been invited to present a season of events at the ICA (London).



Image: Radage & Hardaker, Kunstraum  2020.
Photo by Julia Sterre.






2021

In September, FUTURERITUAL hosted Mythic Time, a residential workshop at ]performance s p a c e[, co-facilitated by VestAndPage and Joseph Morgan Schofield.





MYTHIC TIME, 2021. Photo by Zack Mennell.








Mythic Time


SPIRITUAL PRACTICES, THE SACRED, RITES AND RITUALS IN PERFORMANCE ART
workshop, Folkestone, 20th - 25th September 2021

The workshop is supported by ]performance s p a c e[ and the Live Art Development Agency.


A workshop by VestAndPage and Joseph Morgan Schofield exploring the (re-)invention of spiritual practices, the sacred, rites and rituals through performance art.


The here-and-now is insufficient. The fog of the capitalist deadland is ossifying. We demand something more. Faced with distance, anxiety and exile, belonging feels mythic. FUTURERITUAL asks: how can the technology of ritual be deployed in the divination, manifestation and sustentation of something else - of alternative [queer] futurities, wherein states of belonging (in difference) are felt deeply and more readily.

Breaking with the here-and-now necessitates a series of temporal maneuvers. Ritual is an apt symbolic technology for this, for ritual is a way of entering time and rendering it habitable through communion.
Photos by Zack Mennell.

Performance art is a potent modality of ritual, for, within performance art, time operates as material. Rites and rituals involve, typically, a series of practices based on images, words, actions, objects, symbols organised in a performative act. They produce resonance and relations. They cultivate the practice of attention. Live Art and performance art practices have been informed on an essential level by ritual practice, and attention to ritual reveals art as a way of holding that which is magic and sacred.

Inside this workshop, we hope to produce a temporary ritual community within which we may explore the (re-)invention of spiritual practices, rites and rituals through performance art.

What is the place of ritual with contemporary performance culture? What happens when we inhabit liminal spaces and thin places through performance? What possibilities do art and ritual hold for remaking ourselves and our world?


We will begin by engaging with our own identity, desire, memory, history and artistic urgency and use these in the expansion of our own artistic ritual practices. We are particularly interested in the processual and transformative qualities of ritual performance - how they may destabilise the normative order, and how they may become the source of our creative acts.

We will undertake a variety of exercises, tasks, performance jams and discussions, involving both solo and communal exploration. We will be responsive to the locality of ]performance s p a c e[ and the Kent coast, working indoors and outdoors, and at different times of the day and night. We will work towards the realisation of a public sharing on the final night. After that we will re-unite for discussion to understand what we have performed and the possibilities contained within it.

some notes on space

As this is an in-person workshop, the number of participants will be limited, and we will work together to set and maintain clear boundaries in view of the pandemic at the beginning of the workshop.

In co-creating this space, we are committed to the principles of ‘braver space’, where difference is acknowledged, where physical and emotional boundaries are respected, where care and inclusion are centred, and where accountability is practiced. We will discuss this further in advance of, and during, the workshop. 

It is important to note that, all too frequently, colonial processes acts of cultural appropriation and vandalism have been practiced within art making. This has been particularly visible in practices where art meets ritual. It has often seemed easy, convenient or acceptable for white artists to fetishise, romanticise and universalise the specific cultural practices or traditions of indigenous people and people of colour. These processes uphold white supremacy. In the curation of other white artists in this workshop space, FUTURERITUAL and VestAndPage seek to amplify the voices of those who engage ethically with these issues, who think critically about their desires and histories, and whose work resists, opposes, or plots an escapes from the capitalist colonial cis-tem.




about the facilitators

VestAndPage

Since 2006, German artist Verena Stenke (b. 1981) and Venetian-born artist and writer Andrea Pagnes (b. 1962) have been working together as VestAndPage and gained international recognition in the fields of performance art, performance-based film, writing, publishing, and with collective performance operas and temporary artistic community projects. Since over a decade, VestAndPage have been exploring performance art and film as phenomena through their collaborative creative practice, as well as through theoretical artistic research and curatorial projects. Their works – a celebration of life – have been presented in museums, galleries, theatres, cinemas and a variety of sites worldwide. Their writings have been extensively published and translated for international readers.

VestAndPage's art practice is contextual and situation-responsive, conceived psycho-geographically in response to social contexts, natural surroundings, historical sites and architectures. In their works they move between the unseen and the unforeseen, the unsaid, the forgotten and the repressed. They inquire performance art as an urgency to explore the physical, mental and spiritual bodies, where moments of crisis or extreme situations often see the crossing of boundaries by the break with norms and known orders, to interface with the ephemeral matter of art and existence.

On December 2012, VestAndPage conceived and initiated the live art exhibition project VENICE INTERNATIONAL PERFORMANCE ART WEEK. Between 2012 and 2016, the project showcased in the Trilogy of the Body historic pioneer works on exhibit in conjunction with live programs of durational performances, presenting over 120 international artists and an ongoing educational program. Since 2017, the project presents in the new format Co-Creation Live Factory an international educational platform with residential and collaborative nature.

Besides sharing their pedagogy on collaborative performance making in intensive workshops and co-creation classes. Since 2019, they are tutoring guest artists at the Master of Performance Practices at ArtEZ University of the Arts, since 2020 at MA Performance at the Norwegian Theatre Academy.

https://www.vest-and-page.de

Joseph Morgan Schofield

Joseph Morgan Schofield (b. 1993, Rochdale, UK) is an artist working with performance, moving image and expanded forms of writing. Articulating their practice as ‘queer ritual action’, their work is broadly concerned with desire, particularly in relation to ecology and queer futurity. This queer ritual action foregrounds the immediacy of the sweating, wanting, sensate non-binary body. Understanding art-making as a technology of divination, they consider their work to be a tool for the creation of contemporary myth; a site for the work of mourning, yearning, processing and communing.

Understanding acts of gathering and communing as central to their practice, Joseph’s work incorporates curating, producing, facilitating, mentoring and teaching. Joseph organises FUTURERITUAL, a performance and research project considering ritual and queer futurity, and is the co-founder and facilitator of The Sunday Skool for Misfits, Exprimenters and Dissenters, with Martin O’Brien and Shabnam Shabazi.

With Benjamin Sebastian, Joseph is the co-founder and co-director of VSSL studio (London, UK) and the assistant director of ]performance s p a c e[ (Folkestone, UK). Joseph is a member of Chisenhale Dance Space (London, UK) and of the Anam Cara collective (International), and they are a frequent collaborator of Venice International Performance Art Week (Italy). 

https://www.josephmorganschofield.com








2019

In September, we presented three days of free performance, screenings and discussion in at the Live Art Development Agency and Kunstraum in East London. The programme was supported by Arts Council England.



FR supported Charlie Ashwell with a small commission to create spells, an experiment in the technical potential of dance and language to produce alternative orientations to the world.

In June, FR hosted shared action, a performance encounter between selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield at Chisenhale Dance Space.





(top): Leman Daricioğlu, surrounded by water, Kunstraum , 2019. Photo by Julia Sterre. (bottom): Charlie Ashwell with Es Morgan, spells, Kunstraum, 2019. Photo by Jemima Yong.

Kunstraum


performances, Saturday 28 September 2019

An day of performances by Leman Sevda Darıcıoğlu, Radage & Hardaker, Augusto Cascales, and Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley.

We are working on making text and audio versions of Phoebe’s works available.

Leman Sevda Darıcıoğlu, surrounded by water, Kunstraum, 2019. Photos by Julia Sterre.
 
Leman Sevda Daricioğlu produces mostly in the field of performance art but also (rarely) in other disciplines like installation, video, photography etc.  They see the process of making art as a performative research on the self. They use the work as a tool to transform their limits and their subjectivity and also to create new corporal concepts to think, to imagine, to dream, to act, to be and to become.


Response by Phoebe Patey-Ferguson.


Radage & Hardaker, Kunstraum, 2019. Photos by Julia Sterre.


Radage & Hardaker is the close collaboration of Alicia Radage and Ro Hardaker.

"Our work focuses on the body in a state of flux. We are concerned with gender and sexuality, care and violence. We are concerned with how the body interacts with other bodies and other materials and dismantling the hierarchy built into body politics and materialism, how it contaminates, is contaminated, dilutes, is diluted, concentrates, is concentrated. We make work with our bodies as the starting point."


Response by Phoebe Patey-Ferguson.



Augusto Cascales, Luciferin in My Belly , Kunstraum, 2019. Photos by Julia Sterre.


Augusto Cascales is a Brazilian artist based in London, working across different mediums at the intersection of spontaneity and criticality. Using queer feminist and post-colonial positions, their (soma)tic ritualistic practice explores deviant forms of knowledge production and distribution.

Lucifer in My Belly is a somatic ritual weaving togther sigil magic, queer club culture and the mating call of fireflies.


Response by Phoebe Patey-Ferguson.



Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley, You Are Being Let Into A Space, Kunstraum, 2019. Photos by Julia Sterre.

Danielle Brathwaite-Shirley is an artist living and working in London.

"I CREATE WORK THAT SEEKS TO ARCHIVE BLACK TRANS EXPERIENCE. I USE TECHNOLOGY TO IMAGINE OUR LIVES IN ENVIRONMENTS THAT CENTRE OUR BODIES...

THOSE LIVING, THOSE THAT HAVE PASSED AND THOSE THAT HAVE BEEN FORGOTTEN
"

Response by Phoebe Patey-Ferguson.


Kunstraum


performances, Thursday 26 September 2019

An evening of performances by Charlie Ashwell, Sandra Stanionyte and Kelvin Atmadibrata.


Spectral formations + gatherings/convenings

commissioned response by Sara Sassanelli

Recently I have been interested in the repurposing of objects + sound. Mainly by listening to ASMR, but also through electronic music. The repurposing of half-recognisable samples as a cartographic or architectural exercise. Music that allows me to delve into the spectrality of its sound - struggling through the possibility of constantly evolving layers. Sound that holds subterranean memory.

Charlie Ashwell’s provocation with spells is a direct one. How can poetry - or spells - or ritual practices - be harnessed as technology to propel beyond capitalist desires? The rules are clear: cards delineate the space, a circle; audience sits outside; performers inside. The cards are signifiers that trigger previously arranged poems, spells and political desires. There’s a stack of cards that identically match the circle and Charlie and Es take it in turns to draw a card each. Once the card has been drawn they read out the the triggered poem/spell/political desire and then choose a time frame to dance within. The process becomes alchemy, a manifestation of the poetics of movement, the collapse of time and the inability to harness a stable vision of the future. It’s in this slippage, or instability that I think I am witnessing something clearly. A temporal disjunction where poetic assertion, spell casting and repurposing of sound, movement and divination create a space-time continuum of queer desire. Every round of selection, reading and action becomes a different splintering insight into generative possibility. I get embarrassed in the moment, by my own desire to feel moved by the actions, but then I am moved. Or shifted away from the energy I came in with.

Spectrality became recurring - through spectral architectures and ghost-figures. A solid block of flour looks like transmutation. It becomes concrete, or a flat rock formation, or wooden plank. It creates affect that dissolves and reforms as I watch. Sandra Stanionyte’s intention fills the room, but sometimes breaks as flour dissolves and moves. The body then breaks the architecture. Sandra falls into the solid block, which disintegrates in a way that I can only describe as lowkey. Not soft or subtle, but self-aware and unbothered by the dust it creates in room. Pinning dress to shoulders, the gap between the body and the dress becomes a precarious architecture. A dress is placed on a hanger which is wedged between one of the windows of the room. My desire was to focus on its measurements, the micro relationship between the edges of the hanger and the wall become the most interesting thing, shattered by the weight of the hanger.

Spectral appearances of memories that are not mine appear in Kelvin Atmadibrata’s work. The ghost of a weight, that is actually replaced by an empty white object. The absence of sound, which I think is only due to my attention being so focused on the rings holding the spectral weight. I think I missed the sound, and am now imagining a low drone, that intensifies as I watch. I’m imagining the different possible transmutations of the objects. Weight, metal loops, concrete floor, a different kind of alchemy to the first one occurs. A symbolic alchemy where each object or state of being relies on the next in order to create a whole, or a half-whole (a momentary whole). As everything dissolved, I am reminded of the work required in filling in the gaps + the pleasure of gaps in the first place.



Charlie Ashwell with Es Morgan, spells, Kunstraum, 2019. Photo by Jemima Yong.

Charlie Ashwell is a dance artist working with choreography, writing and dramaturgy. 


Charlie’s practice explores the tensions, ironies and possibilities of witchcraft, bringing it into contact with experimental dancing and feminist politics. Recent solo Banishing Dance was performed at Space Studios, Hackney, as part of FUTURERITUAL, and Wellcome Collection as part of SPLAYED Festival, in partnership with The Place. spells is a new research project in collaboration with queer dance and performance artist Es Morgan, building on their mutual interest in tarot reading, spell-casting, poetry and choreographic scores.

spells is an experiment in the technical potential of dance and language to produce alternative orientations to the world.

A choreographic research project in collaboration with Es Morgan, drawing together ideas around witchcraft, transformation, radical politics and choreographic scores.


Sandra Stanionyte, Between a Memory and a Memorial, Kunstraum, 2019. Photo by Jemima Yong.

Sandra Stanionyte is an interdisciplinary artist working in the field of performance art and architecture.


"I look at my work as a triangulation between memory, architecture, and the body as a site. I’m interested in the ways in which a study of space (architecture) is equivalent to a study of body in space.

And how a body, my body, can become a site to express personal memories and psychological states as a conceptual architecture which is both internal and external. Whilst physical architecture itself is transformed into a metaphor for both material and immaterial spaces. In other words: my body becomes a house leaking memories, a site for a research and a tool for action."


Kelvin Atmadibrata, til they are caught  in the trap, Kunstraum, 2019. Photo by Jemima Yong.

Kelvin Atmadibrata recruits superpowers awakened by puberty and adolescent fantasy.


Equipped by shōnen characters, kōhai hierarchy and macho ero-kawaii, he often personifies power and strength into partially canon and fan fiction antiheroes to contest the masculine and erotica in Southeast Asia.

He works primarily with performances, often accompanied by and translated into drawings, mixed media collages and objects compiled as installations. Approached as bricolages, Kelvin translates narratives and recreates personifications based on RPGs (Role-playing video games) theories and pop mythologies.

til they are caught in the trap is a plea for aid from self-inflicted enslavement and abuse.


LADA


Screenings, Tuesday 24 September 2019

An evening of artist films, performance to camera and archival documentation by artists thinking through ritual, performance and queer futurity. The evening featured works by Jon John, Martin O’Brien and Sheree Rose, and Nwando Ebizie.



Nwando Ebizie is a multidisciplinary artist and curator whose work converges around immersive installation, performance art personas, experimental theatre, neuroscience, music and African diasporic ritual. Carving out her own particular strand of Afrofuturism, she combines research into the neuroscience of perception (inspired by her own neurodiversity) and an obsession with science fiction with a ritualistic live art practice.
Martin O’Brien’s work draws upon his experience of suffering from cystic fibrosis. His performance and video art is concerned with physical endurance, disgust long durations and pain base practices in order to address a politics of the sick, queer body and examine what it means to be born with a life-threatening disease, politically and philosophically.

Sheree Rose is an American photographer and performance artist. Her photographs documented the BDSM and queer subcultures in Los Angeles during the early 1980s. With her partner and creative collaborator, performance artist Bob Flanagan, they explored sexuality, BDSM, death, and daily living with terminal illness.
In his performances, Jon John (1983 - 2017) incorporated references to high fashion, pop music, so-called ‘modern primitivism’ and industrial culture, magic, sadomasochism, and sex. Including uniquely sentimental uses of bloodletting, hook suspensions, dancing on thorns, and DIY surgery, Jon John’s own tattooed, scarred and ‘hacked’ body was central to his work as an artist.




Following the screenings, Joseph Morgan Schofield chaired a conversation with Martin O’Brien and Nwando Ebizie. 



Shared Action


Performance, Chisenhale Dance Space, June 2019

An encounter between two artists, sharing space, action, material and time, responding to, and exploding, the limits of language and desire.


The solo practices of performance artists selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield are individually mesmerising and unnerving. They share a keen sense of materiality and are marked by a wilful urge to act. In this encounter, they presented their moving, poetic works in dialogue with each other, pushing at the limits of language and desire.




memory as the trace of the poetic within the words that distract us

selina bonelli is interested in the processing of anxieties where one reformulates them into motions and actions as a possibility of teasing out the inadequacies of language. By making images in the moment, they employ performance to explore the relationship between the uncommunicable and the unspeakable.

https://selinabonelli.wordpress.com
Joseph Morgan Schofield (b. 1993, Rochdale, UK) is an artist working with performance, video and text. Articulating their practice as ‘queer ritual action’, their workis broadly concerned with desire, particularly in relation to ecology and queer futurity. This queer ritual action foregrounds the immediacy of the sweating, bleeding, wanting, sensate non-binary body and they understand art-making as a technology of divination; a tool in the creation of contemporary myth; a place of mourning, yearning, processing and communing.

https://josephmorganschofield.com

selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield, FUTURERITUAL, Chisenhale Dance Space, 2019. Photos by Antonia Eugenie.







2018

In Autumn 2018, FUTURERITUAL presented a touring platform, visiting Leeds, London, Bristol and Folkestone. The programme was supported by ]performance s p a c e[ and Arts Council England.

 In February, FR hosted a night of performances at VfD (London).






Eunjung Kim, Temporal Fragments, Hackney Showroom, 2018. Photo by Jemima Yong.

]performance s p a c e[


performances, Folkestone, November 2018

An evening of performances by Alex Billingham, Niko Wearden, selina bonelli and Joseph Morgan Schofield, hosted by ]performance s p a c e[.



Alex Billingham - raw hide

photos by Manuel Vason

Flesh uncurling

Dirty feet in rainbow lights

Soft, soft


Scratching emergency blankets

And memories


The sound of quiet violence

Pushing glitter in wounds


A temporary sustained collapse

Pouring into flesh twitches

Holding silence with shaving foam and layers of glitter itches


Onto elbows and knees

Caressing necks and thighs

Pushing on layers to take flight again

In strong arm UV light power poses


We shuffle in our skin watching you shredding


How do you scratch a layer on?

The body erratic and offering

Silently you drip in blue light

 
I forget your pool exists and think about forgotten wombs

About birthings that have been long before

And birthings you perform yourself now


I pour red wine for comfort

Into your long red latexted whimpers

Pulling at your heart

Reaching for the sky with tiny cries

Strong arm fading


Bandages of pink breasts

Cut our breathing with every sticky stretch

While chests of milky breasts wheeze

My nostrils fill with your shaking

The lights fade into melancholic rainbows as you peel your mouth off

Spitting on gold

Removing genitals


Bandages of pink breasts

Cut our breathing with every sticky stretch

While chests of milky breasts wheeze


My nostrils fill with your shaking

The lights fade into melancholic rainbows as you peel your mouth off

Spitting on gold

Removing genitals


What does it mean to endure?


My questions get stuck in the air

Waiting on the sounds forming to be pushed out your mouth


A lifetime of growing and removing layers of becoming that same flesh again and again


Scratchy maps emerge

Fireworks bang outside as I watch the glitter ripple around your belly button


The joy of the unspectacular


Tiny latex mountains form beneath you

Pushed by palms from your womb

Tenderly removing your foreskin


text by Bean


Niko Wearden - Selkie Skin

photos by Manuel Vason

Felt fingers folding

Stealing words



Fingers unfurl

Woolen moustaches of sailors

The calm before the storm



Twin bodies

Eggless and eggy



Membranes

Fibres of souls

Stuck in history


Archaic analogue antique

Unlearning



A memory I can’t recall

A sadness I don’t know I know

Amplified by plastic



And the beauty of trying.


text by Bean



selina bonelli 

photos by Manuel Vason


Stare me down

To nothing

I know

And everything


Pockets,

Always pockets

And heartbeats

Racing



To unframe yourself

Always,

Always tiny invisible tensions

Always


Uncontained

Always,

Always my eyes can not be wide enough to contain it



Always silence & violence remains



Our guts curdle your milk


text by Bean



Joseph Morgan Schofield - yesterdary I dreamt of flying

photos by Manuel Vason


Sacred skeletal wings

Trying to take off through heavy dust

Fighting



Spitting golden threads on mirrored wounds

Remaking

Bloody ‘I’s

In latex gloves


Eratic and urgent openings



Kneeling

Griefing

Sighs


Needles of labour and legacy

Dirtied knees for our collective prayers

Ware new paths, new patterns

To fly



A disobedience

A commitment to dirt



Eyes burn,

Pointing the future into existence


text by Bean





Alex Billingham is a genderqueer performance artist and Associate Curator for Vivid Live, whose practice mixes endurance, visual arts, low-fi tech and installation. Visceral and physically exhausting, pushing what their body can take, trusting their safety to the audience, stripping away supports to leave something tender and violent. A fascination with the fetishization of Nuclear dread and an obsession with outdated hopes for the future all bleed into the work.

RAWHIDE is abject, touching on body dysmorphia, scar tissue, locked in syndrome, evolution, sheading skin, body horror and learning to love yourself Scratching away layers of latex and skin, the length of the piece takes its toll, physically and mentally breaking down the performance. Everyone feels uncomfortable in their own skin, like fighting a losing battle with their own body. “I’ve experienced body dysmorphia, considering surgery and eventually learning to embrace my own body.”

thinking about icarus and deleuze and gender and my father. this is a leap of faith. the purpose is never to fly.

Joseph Morgan Schofield is a performance artist working across the body, text and endurance work.

in exploring the relationships that different types of memory have to gestures, images and materials, selina bonelli is interested in how our bodies make sense of things that are unspeakable, uncommunicable, and how this affects us both personally and societally. selina bonelli’s work looks at the effects of the deterritorialization of materials and actions in order to approach a language beyond the inadequacies it presents us with. threads and odours form an unreliable combine that sits precariously between action and stillness. in the encounter i'm looking at how we re-member the past: exploring our collective amnesia through action, gesture and the relationship between object and material.

Niko Wearden is a performance and visual artist interested in queer intimacies and ways of being okay alone. Niko works in and through spaces with others, their work is often durational, productive or destructive, and could be described as ritual, rite of passage or space for transition/ transformation. They work with the body and with physical materials.

Niko has shown work extensively across the UK and Finland, as well as internationally, including at The Royal Academy in London.

Felt (1)

A kind of cloth made by rolling and pressing wool or another suitable textile accompanied by the application of moisture or heat, which causes the constituent fibres to mat together to create a smooth surface. - Oxford English Dictionaries (2018)

Something about the sea.

A general muddle of yearning and un-belonging. Heading north.

This performance included live musical accompaniment from Logan Johnson.


arnolfini


performances, Bristol, October 2018

An evening of performances by DAS GLAMOR, Joseph Morgan Schofield, Kitty Fedorec, Luke Jordan and Sean O’Driscoll, and hosted by Arnolfini.



I cannot take the future, or ritual, for granted. A future ritual is something we do together and I definitely don’t agree with all of you. How to be together, then? How to remember what we came for?

In order to watch, to be there, receiving, thinking with, thinking about, F U T U R E R I T U A L - a series of performances, a series of series, a plural in the singular, a singular plurality, a thread, a plait - I’ll agree to disagree; to struggle, to writhe, to wiggle with my eyes and words, to embrace partiality, to allow the risk of cliché, the cliché of risk, to bounce off my burning body and onto yours.

The body burns because it’s embarrassing to watch performance, to perform audiencehood, to acquiesce to encounters you never sought out or imagined; to allow intimacy into square feet you would rather keep for yourself; a fragile, unsafe self. The mutual suspension of comfort for something else is perhaps the most precious ritual of all, though, so for now I agree to be thrown sideways into other people. Into other people’s futures. Into other people’s rituals. Let’s begin, I think. I stop thinking.

Kitty Fedorec has a suitcase of cassette tapes. She’s gothed-up, wig flying in our faces, daring us to diss or squirm or admire too lovingly, revealing our own fandoms, our own dominions. I lean forward. There are atlases on the floor. She stands on them. A string of dances, steady and studied.

She dances in defiance of something and I wonder whether every dance ever is in defiance of something. I think about my recent desire for only dances, no dancers. She speaks about mental health and feeling under constant threat. She speaks about the nation state being unwell. “The nation state wishes it was an eagle.”

She conducts a participatory war game with two audience members and I think about individual identity within and against national identity; the requirement to participate in nationhood, to “be a good sport”. I feel caught out; I’ve said ‘yes’ to this; to party politics; to paying taxes; to pressing send; to submission. Perhaps we can’t make art without making conversation with the parasites; the war machines. We’re already good sports for turning up, turning out, turning our love for possibility into social capital. To turn away is to taint the possibility of togetherness actually being pleasurable at some point in the future. I wonder whether the nation is always doomed to make war, whether the individual is always doomed to be a national treasure, whether outbreaks of violence are always synonymous with war and what would it be to violently break the state, our collective state of loneliness; the individual, the art institution, the dancer, the family, the monarchy, the dutiful subject, the artwork-as-commodity, the infinite misunderstandings of each other, into a billion shards? I wonder about this country. I wonder how to get rid of the billionaires. I wonder about sunken ships. And sunken desires for escape. How to raise them from the bottom of the sea?

I can’t remember how she ended up naked, but I do remember her singing with her band, which suddenly arose from the corner of the room, like solid ghosts. Gold leaf falls off her face. She’s only wearing a biker jacket, and a pair of Ray-Bans. I want to hang off her. Every word.

Kitty Fedorec, Some Day Dominion, 2018. Photo by Asher Fynn.

Joseph Morgan Schofield acts with and upon their body, calmly not-so-calmly piercing skin as if it was fabric. Not-so-calm because it requires me to be there, the witness, diluted in my witnessing, distracted, wanting rather to drape myself over the person next to me and breathe only in for a while, as Joseph takes care of breathing out. Or is it the other way around? Joseph does the breathing in, we do the breathing out. The tip of my tongue presses lightly into my front teeth and I suck the sides of this stupid, mute, always-active organ inwards, creating a rush of cold air between top and bottom jaw. “Thssshhhhhh.”
 

Would I bite the bullet? Would I grab the needle? Would I feel pleasure? I feel only their body matters. I feel heroic for not running up and saving them and then I feel stupid and then I feel sad and then I feel brave and then I feel hot. We’ve all agreed to watch and learn. We consent to every moment because they’ve consented to the longest moment and all the moments and all the labour before and afterwards. The cleaning, the white flannel that turns red, the tentative, too-casual post-show discussions, the avoidances, the calm after the storm, the storm swirling above and around us as they tip hot wax onto their arm.

There’s a tension between action and impact, reaction and smooth, calm observation. Body as observant subservience. Malleable bloodstream. Tightening skin. Decisions made long ago coming back to serve us an enormous platter of fuck-the-present, hold-on-tight, simply-close-your-eyes-if-you-need-to feeling.

I’m starting to really want a tattoo.


Joseph Morgan Schofield, yesterday I dreamt of flying, 2018. Photo by Asher Fynn.

DAS GLAMOUR are two but actually three people. I’m reminded of a Twitter meme about an imagined future with no men. Funny how fast a group of three becomes societal in scale. Perhaps I’ve re-internalised the compulsion to reproduce that haunted me for a while between 2014 and 2017. I can see them reproducing like spider plants - asexually - which isn’t to say they don’t have sex, but that sex is at last discontinuous with making babies - before and beyond my eyes and into a future beyond patriarchy, a world and word that feels so vintage already. Perhaps I’m getting ahead of myself. Perhaps you’re not ready to sign up to this spider future. In any case, I’m not entirely sure how we get from here to there without killing anyone - cookshops of the future, etc - so for now I’ll scale it down and focus on these three; this time.

It was 2018. It was autumn. I was wearing black. I was squatting, open-mouthed, with a group of other open mouths in a recently-defunded arts space to watch silently one of the most unapologetically constructivist, bish bash bosh, open-heartedly curious, in-love utopic, choreographic body-voice-drum-song works I’ve ever squatted open-mouthed in front of.
They yodelled. They stood on boxes. They stamped. Their voices were clear and calm and technical and guttural without the machismo of musicians and definitely none of the desperate, aspirational subjecthood of dancers. They just sang because singing is an animal faculty. They moved because moving is in them. Because singing and moving and drumming are pure vibration. Pure desire.


DAS GLAMOUR, In Iridescent Iteration, 2018. Photo by Asher Fynn.

Are they the vision of a future with only dances, no dancers? Who is the artist here? Who is the muse? Who has been taught? Who did the teaching? Who downloaded the holy text and from where? Who is this serving if not everybody? Who are they if not the ghosts of a future ritual without the need for fixed meanings or labour-as-we-know-it or nations or property or anxiety, except the continuous consideration of which pleasure we’ll take next?

Is there violence in dragging ritual from its deep history and chucking it into the future? Or chucking the future upon it? Maybe. But then I’m not much of a pacifist. I like things that smash together. I like shards. I like to read futures from fragments. We’re all witches here, DAS GLAMOUR seem to say, and don’t care for our agreement or disagreement. Just that we’re here. And it’s not that special. Perhaps performance isn’t that special, just unusual.

How many times have you slipped through time into a dark room to watch silently the glitter, the reddening skin, the guitar strings, the erotic implications, the lighting rig, the other nervous witches? Let’s assume there is the potential to agree on a future. Or many intersecting futures, at least. You cannot produce your future separately from mine, or theirs, so don’t even try. Don’t even try.

DAS GLAMOUR sing, and their song stays with me:

“desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire, desire”

Text by Charlie Ashwell.


Luke Jordan, 2018. Photo by Asher Fynn.


Sean O’Driscoll, datum, 2018. Photo by Asher Fynn.


In Iridiscent Iteration a lure-dance paired with a work out on chewing gum. In Iridiscent Iteration involves and explores the harmonies and dissonances between alpine rituals, Schuhplatteln, self-optimization and fitness cult, Aerobic, goat figures and processes of artistic production. By appropriating and fragmneting the movement material of Areobic and Schuhplatteln a new independent luredance emerges. Possibly the lure-dance will attract queer-feminist goat creatures. New dances and songs are combined to a ritual of self-empowerment, agency and celebrations of pleasure.

The performance duo DAS GLAMOUR was formed in 2018 by Bernadette Laimbauer and Christa Wall and is based in Linz and Vienna. Their work is a sensual investigation of folk rituals, customs, iterations, circuits and transformations to their queer-feminist potentials.



thinking about icarus and deleuze and gender and my father. this is a leap of faith. the purpose is never to fly.

Joseph Morgan Schofield is a performance artist working across the body, text and endurance work.

séance: communication between dead and living, past / future and the present.possession: duality of the body as body possessed by an alien materiality and self possessing body, whilst also having the capacity to be possessed through an affective immersive experience leading to a lose of subjectivity in the rhythmic materiality of sensation, a ‘nocturnal anarchy of the senses’.exorcism: cathartic expulsion of unwanted elements from the mind / body.

Luke Jordan’s works take many forms; experimental sound, live art, installation, sculpture, photography, video and text; often combining many of these elements. The artist is interested in speculations upon the temporality of the human as one among many decaying material forms, haunted by imagined pasts and futures, unexplored territories, communications with the unknown, and by the vast unknowable, without and within the human body. His work incorporates manifestations of primal and cultural anxieties, in material decay, corruption and impurity through the emergence of hybrid forms and figures, disrupting the borders of the human, and of ‘civilization’.

seán o’driscoll is an emerging performance artist , recently graduating from warwick university . seán's previous work , WAH (a waluigi Clown) , showed at the camden people's theatre in april 2018 (video link available hmu). new twitter & instagram pals are always welcome (bearing gifts or not) : @seanodriscoll_

‘first-footing' is a waning scottish new years ritual , wherein the fortune of the year hinges on the first person to be welcomed through the door bearing symbolic gifts . in the wake of GDPR and echoing y2k, datum reduces the first-foot and gifts into information and code , and explores the relationship between distrust in technology and crossing thresholds of time.
Kitty Fedorec is a dance artist and perpetual teenage-goth. Her work is informed by her relationship with mental health and neuro-divergence. It looks at the need of humans to control their environments, internal and external, and its expression through a spectrum of rituals, compulsions and religious practices. The Misters of Circe are a gender non-conforming Sisters of Mercy tribute.

Some Day Dominion is inspired by current global politics, historical echoes, my grandparents' experience as refugees, a geopolitical theory from the start of the twentieth century, subculture as refuge and the music of The Sisters of Mercy. It sits between live art, dance, ritual and gig, with music from gender-fucked tribute, The Misters of Circe; an act of phonomancy to create a protective pocket goth world, beyond borders.


hackney showroom


performances, London, October 2018

An evening of performances by Alicia Radage, Anni Movsisyan, Eunjung Kim, Hellen Burrough and Joseph Morgan Schofield.


Response by Benjamin Sebastian
I’m going to write from my heart.

As such I will be writing through memory (time)

With desire (intent)

I will remember what I want                                                                                  to remember.

Everything is relative (not binary) and partial for our hearts are prisms with infinite sides.

By heart, I in no way suggest the shiny pink chocolate box image packaged to us by hetero cis patriarchal capitalism, but rather; the relentless fleshy muscle that pushes and pulls a bloody life force throughout the interiority of ones body.

I’m starting here. In the organic matter. With the flesh...

I remember your burns. I remember your wings. (J.M.S)


Within the matrix of hetero-patriarchy Icarus was suitably punished (death by drowning) for he did not head the instructions of The Father. Bad boy. Yawn. You however, through a poiesis of queer(ed) futility, radiated the knowledge that something is created through a departure from, or failure to adhere to, hetero-patriarchal scripts.

We too have wanted more, refused instruction, scorched our wings and fallen. But we have not drowned. We are awash in an infinite ocean of potential. An Icarian Sea.

I see you.

You messaged me the other day with this quote (after witnessing a performance from Nicholas Tee); “No satisfaction whatever at any time... There is only a queer divine dissatisfaction, a blessed unrest that keeps us marching...” - flying or swimming - “...and makes us more alive than the others.” The quote is from the late choreographer, Martha Graham.

As I watched you manifest your fingers as feathers the transformation was choreographic and outright. I no longer saw fingers, I saw the dance of feather tipped wings in flight. I saw blood fall from your brow. I saw the damage from previous flights.

I remembered and felt that we are not drowning and our unrest reaps its own rewards in our Life.


Joseph Morgan Schofield, yesterday I dreamt of flying. Photo by Jemima Yong.

I remember your words. I remember your blood. (A.R)


I knew you were in the room but I forgot. I was awaiting your entrance and then I remembered (you have always been here). I had just finished speaking with you. I knew what to expect yet still your presence evaded us. Present yet absent from view like so much of our non-binary cultural and history, slowly bleeding through. Quietly, resolutely authoring attention and futures.

As the first drop of (your) blood dispersed on, into and through (it’s a spectrum) the white barrier obscuring any view of your body from us; I remembered the missing, I remembered their trace.

Specifically I remembered the missing Ana Mendieta, recalling the traces and Body Tracks of where flesh once was. I thought about the invisible, monumental grief which occupies the location of loss. What have we lost? What are we loosing? And in a state of searching what will we find beyond it?

The boldest bloodstain permeated at mouth height, silently screaming. A sharp intake of breath and digitally you spoke:

Mining Mountains

Our Ore
Wild Silence

Mother Bent

You stretched time through pitch, pace and loop. We went deep. Deep into the Moors.

Iron rich,
menstruation led.

Northern (m)others wept.

The future is not female. Our bodies remain invisible.

I hear you and remember that our pasts have seeded our futures and that we are here to tend and grow.


Alicia Radage, M, 2018. Photo by Jemima Yong.


I remember the clay. I remember the fruit. (E.K)


In numerous creation myths the Golem is an anthropomorphic being, magically created from inanimate material (usually clay or dust) by the Divine or those closely related to it. The Golem is matter without form, body without soul. The Golem is imperfect. The raison d'etre of the Golem is servitude. We are all Golems beneath Capitalist, Nation State rule.

I M M O R (T) A L I T Y. Bring the Anarchy.

As your golemesque mask quickly erodes you refuse any position of servitude. YOU bring forth form from the clay though the actions and intentions of your body. You forge the phallus and leave it trivial in your wake.

A forbidden fruit becomes form without matter as you tether it, creating cartographies with string and clay.

I M M O R (T) A L I T Y.

You shed your face once and for all. You have turned the Golem back into clay. How can we convince our siblings to do the same?

I remember that NONE ARE FREE UNTIL ALL ARE FREE. I remember where we are and sigh.


Eunjung Kim, Temporal Fragments,  2018. Photo by Jemima Yong.

I remember your hands. I remember the sound. (H.B)


Nerve endings are concentrated in our hands so that we can feel the slightest variations in texture, pressure & temperature and according to philosophies of reflexology; pressure points corresponding to all our major organs and bodily systems are located in the hands and wrists. In numerous faiths the hand is a symbol of protection and healing.

As you kneaded the glass shards into the cement with your palms, a fine dust rose, visible in the beam of the spotlight. I thought about razor edges of tiny particles and my mirror neurons fired, yet I remained indifferent for it appeared that you did as well.

What happens to ones psyche when one engages the entire body through sharp, focalised pressure and micro piercing of the hands?

Through constant manipulations of the shards you flattened the mass (your hands did their protective work) before walking, kneeling and laying naked on the glass. I remember the continuous scrapping and clinking of the glass-on-cement as a drawn sonic ode to things that shatter.

I remembered we are sensitive. I remembered, we are all in need of healing.


Hellen Burrough, 2018. Photo by Jemima Yong.


I remember your future. I remember Her past. (A.M)


The first step in manifesting desire is imagining. The second step is the focusing of intent. You imagined a future beyond global capitalism, hetero-patrichary, white supremacy & coloniality. Together we must focus our intent. Yet these technologies of magic alone will not cease the systems that enslaves us.

As above. So Below. Everything is relative.

In executing a couplet of performances (performance lecture & ritual performance), you facilitated a straddling of the intellectual and the intuitive. In leading ritual under a waxing crescent moon you positioned us between cycles of banishing and manifesting.

When Persephone, Daughter of Demeter (Goddess of All That Grows), ate pomegranate seeds from the hand of Hades (God of the Dead) the seasons were born, she fell in love and happy became Queen of The Underworld. Forevermore Persephone would move between the worlds. Goddess above, Queen below.

As we shared in Persephone’s ritual we acknowledged a sacred truth. We must move between worlds, learning to thrive in all. Our intentions to dismantle hetero, white, patriarchal politics of coloniality will not manifest overnight and they will not manifest as absolute. We must thrive here as well, as Queens in the dark. We will thrive here as well, Goddesses of Light.


Anni Movsisyan, Ritual for Renewal, 2018. Photo by Jemima Yong.


Alicia Radage’s practice spans Performance, Photography and Digital Collage. Their work has been shown across the U.K., Europe, Latin America and India and they have been supported by The British Council. They have undertaken residencies across the U.K., Brazil and India. Radage collaborates with a number of arts collectives, has close collaborations with individual artists and has curated a number of events in the U.K.

M works to seep through our silencing of queered bodies. Wading through the visible, the invisible and what exists in between, M paints images and soundscapes in an attempt to find other ways of knowing.

Hellen Burrough is an artist and producer living and working in London, UK. Hellen works intimately and violently with her own body as material, making live performance work to explore the transgressive feminine body and examine ideas of ritual, pain and healing.

A fairy tale smashed up and expectations shattered.

Our glittering future, broken up and razor sharp.

In a room full of shattered glass shards, a body works to make peace with the pieces left behind.

My artistic practice is based in making rituals, presentations, illustrations, charms, garments and music that aim to explore alternate versions of how we can be in this world. I fold the past, present and future into each other by revisiting herstories, forms of knowledge and practices that have either been purposefully erased or forgotten as we try to survive and resist the oppressive structures we are being forced to live with.” 
Anni Movsisyan

"A study of a West Asian Diasporan's use of magical practices in the early 21st century"

Pardis is a Herstory Teacher from an optimistic future that is borne of a radical shift in peoples' ways of thinking. Pardis will present their Herstorical research on a particular 21st century artist's practices of growth and resistance against the violent world she found herself in, in order to learn more about how their world came to be.

Ritual for Renewal invites participants to eat and drink from a shared pomegranate. We will take a moment to reflect, let go of that which our hearts and minds no longer need to hold onto, and plant seeds of intentions, whether they be personal, collective, political, metaphysical, etc. The choice of fruit aligns with the season and is inspired by the Tree of Life, which has been represented by the pomegranate in West Asian cultures. Ritual for Renewal is a performance with a limited capacity.

Eunjung Kim, a Korean artist based in London. Kim’s practice centres on the process of becoming - the discovery of a sense of agency outside of the limits of social reality and the stability of identity. Through relational textures and encounters, Kim questions the relationship between the machinery of repression and the realm of freedom that erupts within difference. Kim has performed at The Photographers’ Gallery, Limehouse Town Hall, and Steakhouse Live Festival at Artsadmin and Live Art Development Agency, London and Green on Red Gallery, Ireland.

Inspired by the ancient East Asians' shamanistic myth, Mago, Temporal Fragments open the myth and will seek a fragment of it. Desiring ultimate present of the myth that is not affected by existing historical and social power structure. In the present of doing and sharing this work the mythology fractures and decays the chain of signification and the trace forms a new temporal map of geographic formations without any boundaries.

thinking about icarus and deleuze and gender and my father. this is a leap of faith. the point is never to fly.

joseph morgan schofield is a performance artist working across the body, text and endurance work.